Flea Prevention Is Important for Cats Too!

image of a cat.

When most people think of who needs flea prevention, the family dog is at the top of the list, and often cats are forgotten or assumed to be flea free. Dogs are bathed more regularly than cats and when they scratch it’s much more obvious. Cats are very clean creatures; they groom themselves daily and often don’t show as many outward signs of a flea infestation as dogs.

While fleas are annoying and unsanitary; preventing the diseases they spread is a much more important reason for flea prevention for both the cat and for their families. Fleas feed on blood and breed very quickly and effectively. Young kittens are most at risk for developing anemia simply from being fed on by large numbers of fleas. It is important to address flea infestations early in young cats.

Fleas are the intermediate host for tapeworms and when a cat grooms, it ingests fleas and flea feces resulting in infection. The tapeworms develop into adults in the intestines. Tapeworms can cause no symptoms with very mild infestations to severe malnutrition and death with severe cases. Humans can also become infected with tapeworms through the flea.

Haemotrophic mycoplasma is a bacterial disease transmitted during the feeding process of the flea. It infects the red blood cells in cats and stimulates the cat’s own immune system to destroy those red blood cells. Infection can result in a severe and fatal anemia without treatment. Mycoplasma is most common in areas with lots of cats because the fleas transmit it cat to cat, however. Even cats that don’t socialize are at risk.

There are many flea prevention options available from your veterinarian. The most common are topical preparations applied one time monthly, however, there are other options including injections that last for months and oral medications. Some flea prevention kills adult fleas, others prevent fleas from breeding. It is important to discuss your individual cat's options based on his or her lifestyle and needs. It is also important not to use homeopathic/ herbal preparations without first discussing them with your veterinarian.

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Broad River Animal Hospital

Our Regular Schedule

Office Hours

Monday:

7:30 am-7:00 pm

Tuesday:

7:30 am-6:00 pm

Wednesday:

7:30 am-6:00 pm

Thursday:

7:30 am-7:00 pm

Friday:

7:30 am-6:00 pm

Saturday:

8:00 am-2:00 pm

Sunday:

Closed

For Appointments

Monday:

8:30 am-6:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:30 am-5:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:30 am-5:00 pm

Thursday:

8:30 am-6:00 pm

Friday:

8:30 am-5:00 pm

Saturday:

9:00 am-1:00 pm

Sunday:

Closed

Testimonials

Read What Our Clients Say

  • ""I've been taking my babies to you since 2007 and everyone knows my little ones. Dr. Stramaglia has diagnosed + saved the lives of 2 of them. All the vets are super and caring as are the front personnel + vet techs. I've even had home visits.""
    Desire H.
  • ""The best veterinary care in the country - Dr. Lamothe always has the best interest of my dog in mind, goes above and beyond to make sure my dog is well taken care of and thoughtfully answers all of my questions.""
    Jennifer W.
  • ""I am a client of many years. Everyone from the front desk staff, to the techs, to every doctor. Broad River is comprised of consistently pleasant, knowledgeable, gentle and compassionate people who provide the utmost in professionalism and care.""
    Colleen P.
  • "I've been coming for 33 years I think that speaks for Itself."
    Arthur S.
  • "Very satisfied. Very thoughtful, nice people."
    Cornelia F.
  • "5 stars all the way! When I first started taking my dog here, he used to shake a lot, now he perks up and loves visiting (despite that sometimes he's poked at :)"
    Effie T.